Established In 2005 | 617-599-2003
Cart 0
The voyage of Anahita : Single-handed round the World by Captain Louis Bernicot ; Translated from the French by Edward Allcard

The voyage of Anahita : Single-handed round the World by Captain Louis Bernicot ; Translated from the French by Edward Allcard

$ 89.99

London : Rupert Hart-Davis, 1953. First English Translation Edition. Hardcover. 189 pages ; Photographic illustrations, map ; 19 cm. 10 shilling dust jacket, with lots of rips and tears to jacket's edges. Pencil marking on front and rear dust jacket inner flap. No markings to pages. Binding is firm.

 

From the dust jacket :

CAPTAIN BKRNICOT'S Single-handed voyage round the world is very little known. 11 was completed at the end of May 1938, but his account did not appear until 194a and then only in a limited French edition. Now Edward A Heard, the well-known small-boat sailor, has translated it into English, and it can take its place on the same shelf with Slocum, Pidgeon and Gerbault.

It was Slocum's Sailing Alone Around the World that inspired Bernicot to attempt a similar voyage and to have his cutter built on the same wide-beamed plan as the Spray. He left Carantec in North Brittany in August 1936, and sailed across the Atlantic towards Cape Horn, by way of Madeira and the Argentine coast. Like Slocum he met fierce head-winds at the entrance to the Magellan Strait, but he was lucky enough to win past Cape Pillar at his first attempt. There he was held up again by contrary gales for a whole week, and was so crippled by lumbago that he could barely crawl about the deck.

Thereafter he made good progress across the Pacific by way of Rikitea and Papeete to Coconut Island in the Torres Strait. Almost at once he moved on to Thursday Island and the Keeling Islands, where he beached the Anahita and painted her on the same beach that Slocum had used. On the way home he called at Mauritius, Reunion, Durban, Cape Town, Pointe-Maire and the Azores, reaching the Gironde just over twenty-one months after he had set out, the shortest time—so far as we can discover—taken by any small-boat circumnavigator.

 



Share this Product