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  • Sisters of the Brush: Women`s Artistic Culture in Late Nineteenth-Century Paris by Tamar Garb
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Sisters of the Brush: Women`s Artistic Culture in Late Nineteenth-Century Paris by Tamar Garb

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Publisher : Yale University Press
Binding : Hardcover
Pages : 216
Publication Date : 4/27/1994
Condition : BRAND NEW
The Union of Women Painters and Sculptors was founded in Paris in 1881 to represent the interests of women artists and to facilitate the exhibition of their work. This lively and informative book traces the history of the first fifteen years of the organization and places it in the contexts of the Paris art world and the development of feminism in the late nineteenth century. Tamar Garb explores how the Union campaigned to have women artists written about in the press and admitted to the Salon jury and into the prestigious Ecole des Beaux-Arts and describes how the organization's leaders took their campaigns into the French parliament itself. Although the women of the Union were often quite conservative politically, socially, and stylistically, says Garb, they believed that women had a special gift that would enhance France's cultural reputation and maintain the uplifting moral-cultural position that seemed in jeopardy at the turn of the century. Focusing on the developments that made the prominence of the organization possible, Garb discusses the growth of the women's movement, educational reforms, institutional changes in the art world, and critical debates and contemporary scientific thought. She examines contemporary perceptions of both art and femininity, showing how the understanding of one affected the image of the other. This book reverses conventional accounts of late nineteenth-century French art, offering a new picture of the Paris art world from the point of view of a group of women who were marginalized by its dominant institutions. From Library Journal Garb here transforms her historically self-conscious feminist contextualizing dissertation "Soeurs de pinceaux": The Formation of a Separate Women's Art World in Paris, 1881-1897 (The Courtauld Institute of Art, London) into a more popular but still rigorous book for nonspecialist audiences. (Two chapters of the argument were published as journal articles in 1989.) Garb documents the surprising conservatism of the leadership, goals, and campaigns of the Union des Femmes Peintres et Sculpteurs, which successfully led women into the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in 1897. Much of her analysis necessarily centers on politics and the ideological engendering called l'art feminin. Despite her insights, Garb's contributions remain secondary to Charlotte Yeldham's towering study Woman Artists in Nineteenth-Century France and England: Their Art Education (Garland, 1984). Recommended for informed readers. Mary Hamel-Schwulst, Towson State Univ., Md. Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. From the Back Cover The Union of Women Painters and Sculptors was founded in Paris in 1881 to represent the interests of women artists and to facilitate the exhibition of their work. This lively and informative book traces the history of the first fifteen years of the organisation and places it in the contexts of the Paris art world and the development of feminism in the late nineteenth century. Tamar Garb explores how the Union campaigned to have women artists written about in the press and admitted to the Salon jury and into the prestigious Ecole des Beaux-Arts, and describes how the organisation's leaders took their campaigns into the French parliament itself. Although the women of the Union were often quite conservative politically, socially, and stylistically, says Garb, they believed that women had a special gift that would enhance France's cultural reputation and maintain the uplifting moral-cultural position that seemed in jeopardy at the turn of the century. Focusing on the developments that made the prominence of the organisation possible, Garb discusses the growth of the women's movement, educational reforms, institutional changes in the art world, and critical debates and contemporary scientific thought. She examines contemporary perceptions of both art and femininity, showing how the understanding of one affected the image of the other. This book