Skip to product information
  • Maxfield Parrish : the early years, 1893-1930 with commentary by Paul W. Skeeters
1 of 1

Maxfield Parrish : the early years, 1893-1930 with commentary by Paul W. Skeeters

Regular price
$ 30.00
Regular price
Sale price
$ 30.00

Secaucus, N.J. : Chartwell Books, 1973. Hardcover. 350 pages : 250 illustrations (200 color) ; 37 cm. Very good copy; no underlines or markings within the pages. Satisfaction guaranteed!


MAXFIELD PARRISH

One of the greatest and best loved artists of the early 20th century, Maxfield Parrish (18701966) has become a classic figure representing the "Golden Age of Illustration" in America.

This magnificent volume is not only an outstanding contribution to the appreciation and understanding of a major American artist, but also represents the most comprehensive collection of Parrish's work ever published. Here are 250 reproductions, 200 in full color, of his best paintings and murals, book and magazine illustrations, posters and advertisements—works that are extremely scarce and valuable today.

Included here are selections from each area of Parrish's art; his famous book illustrations in such classics as Arabian Nights, Knickerbocker's History of New York, and Mother Goose in Prose; his magazine covers from Life, Collier's, Harper's, Scribner's, etc.; his commercial artworks including the celebrated Mazda Calendars he did for General Electric; and his most famous murals, posters, and paintings.

Maxfield Parrish: The Early Years will be a nostalgic art experience to an older generation that knew Parrish well; it will delight and inspire a younger generation that is turning away from the harshness of abstract art. And for all it will bring a momentary escape from everyday life—a return to childhood when the whole world was full of wonder, to mythical days and lands of enchantment.

Parrish was a man in harmony with his times, and received many honors from his own and foreign countries. He painted regularly in his secluded New Hampshire retreat until 1961, and died March 30, 1966, having outlived his wife by thirteen years, and having had one of the longest and most successful careers in the history of American art.